Friday, May 11, 2012

10 Secret Weapons Every Massage Room Needs


If you're a seasoned MT, you've probably already realized the importance of these things... and I'm willing to bet 90% of this list is in your massage room.
That realization no doubt came from experience of not having these things and NEEDING them!

10 secret weapons every massage room needs

So, here's a little list for newer massage therapists.  These secret essentials will really come in handy.

Nualpradid / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

  1. Cough drops or water.
    If ever you get a tickle in your throat and have a coughing fit...know it will happen in the middle of a massage.  Probably with a new client.
    (Plus, your client may need a cough drop at some point as well.)
  2. Aromatic essential oils.
    Particularly helpful if you get cases of stinky feet.  Hey, it's an occupation hazard - it happens!
    Eucalyptus & Peppermint are favorites for sinuses as well.
  3. Aromatic essential oils in a spray bottle.  Or air freshener spray bottles.
    For other cases of unpleasant odors...
  4. Hand sanitizer.
    Great to use after you've massage the feet before moving to other body parts, or throughout the massage.  Also, handy to share with your client if they need to blow their nose while on the table.  Seriously, you just never know when you will need this - so have it!
  5. Kleenex.
    This is just as much for you as it is for your clients.
  6. Hot towels or saniwipes.
    See #2.  I've also had clients come in sweaty from the heat outside or from rushing - and they requested a hot towel to wipe off their face, etc. before their massage. So these are nice to have available if needed.
  7. A fan.
    Working in a massage room that is like an oven is no fun.  Have a fan aimed up high so it blows on you but not your client.
  8. Hair ties.
    For you and your clients.
  9. Hand towels or washcloths for your use.
  10. High protein snacks to refuel during your work day.
What other secret weapons do you have in your massage room?






Cindy Iwlew is co-founder of Bodywork Buddy Massage Software, a complete online management solution for independent massage therapists that includes online scheduling

She continues to operate her own private massage practice of 13 years, and has been an associate instructor for Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy since 2007.  www.BodyworkBuddy.com

26 comments:

  1. We all need extra massage product such as lotions, cremes, gels, oils, ect- it's essential!

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    1. Great addition, Elizabeth - it's definitely a necessity to have extra product! I always have my one pump jar, and a 2nd on stand by for when I need it. Thanks for mentioning it!

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  2. two forms of music. For when pandora unexpectedly quits, or for when you are just sick of the same cds!

    a clock. Be it on your phone, or discretley hidden in the room. a must.

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    1. Oh good ones, Justine! I would even say 2 clocks - I've had mine quit unexpectedly before and had to guess on my time - Adventure!!
      Ditto on the music.... can never have enough music options.

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    2. A wide but short step stool ( hand made to perfection). For those that are vertically challenged and need a little boost for those stretching larger clients.

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    3. Step stools can come in handy for the clients, too! Thanks for the addition, MomDukes!

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  3. I'm curious about the fan! This is my first summer with my own practice and I don't have air conditioning. I've got a swamp cooler but I sure don't want that blowing at my clients when they're on the table. I can try to find a fan but I don't know what to look for. Are there any other tips for keeping clients cool? Are cold stones a good idea or is cooling the room and eliminating the blanket going to be the best approach?

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    1. Hi Amy,
      I use cold stones for certain clients to help keep them cool, but I've always been in an air conditioned environment... some clients might not go for the cold stones. Is your room big enough to have your cooler setup away from the table so it doesn't blow on your clients? Or, maybe you can use some plastic vent covers to redirect the air flow. Or even have the air setup in the other room so it doesn't blow directly on your clients, but is still regulating the overall temperature. While you may be able to keep your clients cool enough on the table, I think it would be much more comfortable for you if you used your cooler - but it might depend on your location and just how hot/humid it gets in your area.
      Good luck and let us know what ends up working best for you!

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    2. I have a small fan that I keep at foot level. I work barefoot and the fan cooling my feet is perfect for keeping me cool and my client does not feel it while they are on the table. I have also kept cold wet towels handy for my client if they get too hot. Works on me too, I drape one around the back of neck for instant cool off.

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    3. great idea, Staci! thanks for sharing.

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  4. Anise, fennel, caraway or parsley seeds to freshen the breath naturally and with no sugar... its better then sucking on a mint or gum. If you don't have the time to brush your teeth its great...They all aid with digestion as well. I keep mine in a small plastic or tin pill box or even straight out of the container you bought it in, the containers with the little holes work best so you can just pour a few in your hand.

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  5. A mirror for clients to put jewelry on and fix hair after the massage.

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    1. Oooh, good one. Yes, especially if clients have to go back to work after their massage.

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  6. i have an array of crystals and candles in the room too x





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    1. thanks for sharing, Anita! I have a couple of beautiful selenite wants that I'm quite fond of in my massage room :-)

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    2. In the last 15 years, I know of 6 Therapists who burned their offices (homes and other businesses) down by using candles! Please don't use them!

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    3. I use the flameless candles. They flicker and even smell a little. It makes a nice addition without the actual fire.

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  7. Hi, Thanks for this list.

    I would add straws, so that if the client is all cozy on the table but needs a sip of water they don't have to get up at all.

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  8. Oops, meant to add:
    Q-tips and eye-make-up remover, or coconut oil works and is wonderful.
    Mints, although peppermint oil works too.
    My clients love a bite of dark chocolate after they get dressed!

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  9. I keep extra pillow cases for wrapping around heat packs, bolsters, etc. and also for folding and tying around my forehead when I start to sweat.

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  10. A rice/herb pack that can be thrown in the microwave quickly. This can be left under the neck (face up), over the neck and shoulders (face down), along the spine and sacrum. Good for cold clients and for loosening up stuck fascia.

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  11. A plant so when I am going back to back and long to be outside I can draw energy from the plant in between sessions.

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  12. I have a window bird feeder....luv to see what birds come to eat while working! Blind is only open a tiny bit and I'm in the country so noone would see in and I see one of our horses sometimes too....to the list I might add a larger bolster which I keep under the table for people that have low back pressure...I also use hand held massagers for areas that need a little extra motivation to release (massage time flys so these help a lot, my pressure along with these tools...biofreeze samples, I keep a pump mouthwash with cups in restroom, combs, brushes, barbicide jar like at hair salon, one client asked for a handheld mirror to see the back of her hair......I will prob. Think of more! 19 years and still add things

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  13. chocolate, thieves spray, table warmer, oil warmer, shea butter for feet, brushes for lymph drainage, body cushions for prenatal, humidifier for winter dryness

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