Bodywork Buddy Blog

Bodywork Buddy is more than an online scheduler. It's a complete online solution to manage your massage practice.

Monday, June 25, 2012

Ideas To Soundproof Your Massage Room


I used to work in a salon/spa.  It was a beautiful place.  The problem?  It was designed by the owners, who had never even had a massage in their life.

The massage room was back by the break room. The entire place had beautiful ceramic tile floors.  Beautiful, noise-carrying, ceramic tile floors.

During every massage, not only could I hear the conversations happening in the break room, but the constant sound of the hair stylists high heels clicking on the tile floor.  (How they could work all day on their feet in heels is beyond me! But that's a whole 'nother blog post...)

The noise drove me nuts.  But never mind me... the real problem?  It was bothering my clients, too.
While I didn't end up staying there long enough to bother with trying for a solution, I figured there are many other therapists out there in possible similar situations.

While I'm no expert on soundproofing, here's some ideas on how to semi-soundproof your massage room, or at least make the noise less noticeable.  (Without breaking the bank.)

I like the concept in this video.  Remember, you don't have to do every wall, or every part of the walls, to make a difference.




I know what you're thinking... why would I want foam covered walls?  But, you could get creative.

One solution to hide the foam is these awesome curtain panels from IKEA.  This therapist has a layer of blue fabric in the back, and then a few decorative panels in front for a cool look.
Both the curtains and the curtain panels would not only hide the foam, but add texture and visual interest to your room.

If you don't want to do the foam/cover up approach and don't mind investing a little more material and labor, another way to do some soundproofing is with Green Glue.  Their site includes suggestions for soundproofing existing walls by adding a layer of drywall after using Green Glue.

So, this cuts down on the noise through the walls... but what about that ceramic floor?  It's wise to invest in a rug for you room, with some thick padding.
Also, a soundproof door bottom.  (who knew there was such a thing?)

If you're dealing with noise coming from windows, try some acoustic caulk.

Another approach is to create some white noise.  Fountains are great for this.  Or if you can't do a fountain, stream nature sounds - ocean waves, bubbling brook, thunderstorm, etc. or play an MP3 or CD in a continual loop.

The zenvi face cradle is a great way to have your massage music right at your clients level - so the main thing they will be focusing on is your wonderfully relaxing music.

Have you worked in noisy environments?  What worked well for you to cut down on the noise level in your massage room?

Tweetable: The real problem? It was bothering my clients, too.







Cindy Iwlew is co-founder of Bodywork Buddy Massage Software, a complete online management solution for independent massage therapists that includes online scheduling

She continues to operate her own private massage practice of 13 years, and has been an associate instructor for Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy since 2007.  www.BodyworkBuddy.com






17 comments:

  1. We did a lot more when building my room as I am in a barbershop where they use air hoses to blow the hair off when finished. Very high piched noise, not like the low hum of a blowdryer.
    We did double studded walls with insulation and foam board between.and the door frame itself is a whole other project.... The premise is to not have a solid pathway for sound to travel from outside in. My only lacking place in sound resistance currently Is the door.
    I also worked in a salon, and though they thought out the design a bit better (spa hall with separate entrances and soundproof doors) they lacked the thought about sound carrying through the walls (stylists banging cabinet doors shut.)
    I loved the doors on the spa rooms and hallway... Now I know where to get something similar! Thanks!

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    1. double studded walls with insulation and foam board - nice!
      If you add the soundproof door bottoms - let us know how they work out!

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  2. I'm all about layering noise for soundproofing. At one place I had a fan, an air purifier, a cd that played ocean waves, a fountain, and then the music on top of that. Kept out a lot of noise from the other therapists and the salon downstairs.
    Some clients even preferred the ocean cd or the fountain to the music, so they'd have me turn the music off!

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  3. I have a fan, a sound machine ( it replicates white noise and has different settings for pitch and speed), CD stereo music. My best idea was to make panels for my two windows. I bought the "pink" insulation boards at my local Home Depot, cut them to fit inside each window. then I covered the back side(which faced outside)with room darkening white material and wrapped and covered the front with another solid color complementary fabric to match my room. They help insulate the sound and weather and keep the room dark. I also add a scarf right down the middle of the panel and can change that out for variety.

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    1. Love the insulation for the windows - thanks for the tip! And great idea on adding a scarf for visual interest and easy ability to change it out for variety - love it!

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  4. I have the same issues. I work in a salon where there is hardwood floors and tile as well.so, what I did to help with the noise barrier for my door is I put a blanket and cover it with curtains and hung it over my door on a curtain rod with rings to slide back and forth so that way I can move the curtain as I needed to open the door and then I could also just close as I needed to as well. that helped a great deal with the sound barrier and the noise from the hallway. I also did the same thing with matching curtains for my windows because you can hear the outside traffic noise. The nice thing about that is if you want to change the style of the room, you can.

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  5. All really great ideas. Can't wait to try a few!

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    1. Thanks Toya. Let me know if you try some and how they work out for you!

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  6. I'm considering having soundproof/noise reduction curtains put up in my massage room. I will let you know if this works.

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    1. Please do! Would love to hear how it works out for you.

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  7. Thanks so much for this great blog! I just opened a Boutique Spa and completely forgot about noise reduction for the massage room. I am going to do the foam on the walls with some pretty stuff over that!

    Also- the white noise ideas are awesome! Lol. I love some of the overkill! I'm going with all of it. I don't want our clients disturbed AT ALL and we have reception and a boutique right outside! Geez, what was I thinking??

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    1. Hi Vicky!
      congrats on your new Boutique Spa! how exciting!

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  8. I have a fan and play music on a continual loop. I'm thinking about adding a sound machine though. Thanks for all the great ideas!

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    1. Thanks for the comment, Gina. Glad you found some of the info helpful :)

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  9. I used a fountain for a short time, until my clients let me know it stirred their bathroom urges!

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